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Written by Canterbury Law Group

Restraining Orders and Orders of Protection in Scottsdale

Survivors of domestic violence have several civil and criminal options to protect themselves from further abuse. If you’re looking to determine your legal options, the family law attorneys at Canterbury Law Group have extensive knowledge on orders of protection in Scottsdale and restraining orders in Scottsdale.

Our attorneys operate in many areas of family law, including helping clients obtain a restraining order in Scottsdale. If you’re considering getting legal help, here are common questions you might ask.

1. What is a restraining order? A restraining order is a court order intended to protect you from further harm from someone who has hurt you; to keep the abuser away from you, or to stop harassing you, or keep the abuser from the scene of the violence, which may include your home, place of work, or apartment. It is a civil order and it does not give the abuser a criminal record.

2. Who can get a restraining order? A victim of domestic violence can obtain a restraining order. A victim of domestic abuse means a person protected by the law and shall include any person who has been subjected to domestic abuse by a spouse, or any other person who is a present or former household member and where the victim is 18 years of age or older or who is an emancipated minor.

3. What does a restraining order do? If you are a victim of domestic violence, a judge can sign an order that requires the abuser to obey the court. The protective order is very specific in as far as what the abuser can and can’t do.

  • The abuser can be ordered not to have any contact with you, in person or by phone, text or emails at home, work, or almost anywhere you ask the court to put in the order.
  • The court can order the abuser to leave the house or apartment that you and the abuser share; even if it is in the abuser’s name.
  • Except in unusual situations, the court may grant you custody of your minor children. In some states, the court can also order the abuser to pay child support and support for you. The abuser may also be granted visitation with the child/children under certain conditions. If the children are in danger of abuse, let the judge know.
  • In some states the court may also order the abuser to pay for costs that resulted from the abuse, for example; household bills that are due right away, medical/dental treatment, moving expenses, loss of earnings. The judge can also make the abuser pay your attorney’s fees, and can make the abuser pay damages to you or other people that helped you or got hurt by the abuser.
  • The judge may order the abuser to receive professional domestic violence counseling.
  • The judge can order the police to escort the abuser to remove personal items from the residence, or shared place of business so that you are protected by the police during any necessary contact.
  • The judge has the power under the law to order anything else that will help to protect you, as long as you agree to it.

If you need an order of protection in Scottsdale Arizona, Canterbury Law Group can help you. Contact us today to schedule a consultation. 480-744-7711.

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Written by Canterbury Law Group

Order of Protection Used to Stop Domestic Violence

The Scottsdale attorneys at Canterbury Law Group help survivors of domestic violence utilize legal protection options to defend themselves from further abuse, including obtaining an order of protection. An order of protection is long term, typically for one to five years, and in extreme circumstances, for up to a lifetime. A victim can also renew the order of protection if he or she still feels threatened by his or her abuser.

An order of protection may include many different provisions, including:

  • No Contact Provision – Prohibiting the abuser from calling, texting, emailing, stalking, attacking, hitting, or disturbing the victim
  • Peaceful Contact Provision – Permitting the abuser to peacefully communicate with the victim for limited reasons, including care and transfer for visitation of their child
  • No Contact Provision – Prohibiting the abuser from calling, texting, emailing, stalking, attacking, hitting, or disturbing the victim
  • Stay Away Provision – Ordering the abuser to stay at least a certain number of yards or feet away from the victim, his or her home, job, school, and car. The stay-away distance can vary by state, judge or the lethality of the situation, but is often at least 100 yards or 300 feet
  • Move Out Provision – Requiring the abuser to move out of a home shared with the victim
  • Firearms Provision – Requiring the abuser to surrender any guns he or she possesses (about 2/3rds of states) and/or prohibiting the abuser from purchasing a firearm
  • Counseling Provision – Ordering the abuser to attend counseling, such as batterer’s intervention or anger management

Order of protections may also include children, other family members, roommates or current romantic partners of the victim. This means the same no contact and stay away rules apply to any other listed individual, even if the direct harm was to the victim. Some states allow pets to be protected by the same order, as abusers may harm pets to torment their victims.

If you’re in need of protection, call us today to start the process of filing for an order or protection. Or if you have been recently served with an order of protection, and you feel wrongfully accused, you need to speak to a lawyer immediately. Delaying your response to an order of protection only makes it more challenging to have it quashed by a judge in court later. 480—240-0040. www.canterburylawgroup.com

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Written by Canterbury Law Group

Child Custody During Summer Months

Canterbury Law Group handles various family law matters, including divorce and child custody. Family law is a complex legal area requiring measured and detailed strategy and execution as well as constant upkeep. If you have children with an ex, it’s time to consider future summer vacations and your custody agreement. At Canterbury Law Group, we have many ways to help you keep the legal peace with your ex and enjoy a great summer vacation with your kids.

1. Set Up a Vacation Schedule, And Stick to It. With the kids off from school, there’s plenty of time to plan for vacations and trips. However, it is essential to discuss you plans with your ex. It is typically beneficial to create a vacation schedule with your child custody lawyer, have your ex sign off on it and submit it to a family court judge. By doing this, both parties are clear on where the kids will be and it’s in writing with the court.

2. Be Sure You Don’t Violate Your Custody Agreement. Often, custody and / or visitation agreements have geographical limits, such as your kids can’t leave the state or country. If you’re planning a summer vacation abroad, you may need to have your agreement modified. If you and your ex have already created a vacation plan, it shouldn’t be too difficult to have your ex agree to a custody modification that allows for travel.

3. Use Open Communication. If you have to alter your vacation schedule, notify your ex spouse immediately. In fact, it is always a good idea to notify the other parent of your vacation plans or any change in plans. If you do not inform your ex of your travel plans, be prepared for possible legal action against you. The courts will want a detailed explanation as to why you wouldn’t give up the information and a judge will typically order a parent to divulge vacation plans for safety reasons.

4. Let Kids Communicate With Your Ex While on Vacation. Summer vacation doesn’t mean a communication ban from the other parent. Video calls with Face time or Skype may be a great way to allow your ex “virtual visitation”.

If you need assistance with modifying your child custody agreement for the summer, call us today to schedule a consultation. 480-744-7711. www.canterburylawgroup.com

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