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Written by Canterbury Law Group

Trends Between Age and Divorce Rate

Divorce rates for couples who marry in their teens and after their early 30s are on the rise, while couples who marry in their late 20s and early 30s have the greatest chance of a successful marriage, according to a recent study by a University of Utah professor.

The report, published on for the Institute for Family Studies, showed people who marry at 25 are more than 50 percent less likely to get a divorce than people who wed at age 20. And until age 32, each additional year of age at marriage reduces the odds of divorce by 11 percent. After age 32, the odds of divorce increase by 5 percent each year.

This data has been a considerable surprise and appears to be something that’s just developed over the last 20 years. The data leaves little indication as to why divorce rates are changing for people who marry in their mid-30s or later. The trend also remains constant across a variety of other factors, including gender, race, education, religious participation, sexual history and the size of the metropolitan area they live in.

  • In 1995, the five-year divorce rate for newlyweds younger than 20 was 29 percent, with a rapid decline to 19 percent for couples ages 20 through 24. Divorce rates continued to shrink the older couples were when they got married, with couples ages 35 and older having a divorce rate of 14 percent.
  • An analysis of data from 2006 through 2010, however, showed a 32 percent divorce rate for couples younger than 20. That rate went down to 14 percent for 30- to 34-year-olds, but increased by 5 percent for couples older than 35, creating an upward trend from previous years.
  • In 2011, the median marriage age for men was 29 — the highest in decades — and 27 for women — the highest it’s ever been, according to the report.

No matter what your age, going through a divorce can be one of the most challenging times of your life. If divorce has become a reality for you, hiring a qualified divorce lawyer can be critical to your future. Call the Scottsdale divorce layers at Canterbury Law Group today to schedule you consultation. 480-744-7711 or www.canterburylawgroup.com

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Written by Canterbury Law Group

Johnny Depp Hearings Shine Spotlight on Abuse

The legal problems between Johnny Depp and Amber Heard over her claims of spousal abuse have been making international headlines. The two sides are due to face off as Heard pursues an extension of a domestic violence restraining order that was granted last month. The court set a status conference for August and the judge extended the temporary restraining order that bars Depp from going within 100 yards of Heard.

This celebrity case has raised the importance of protection against domestic violence. At Canterbury Law Group, we know first hand that there are many misconceptions on abuse. If you or someone you know is experiencing domestic violence, here are some answers to common questions:

1. What is Domestic Violence? When you are in a relationship with someone who uses threats, harasses, molests, stalks, attacks, batters or strikes you, your family or your children, that person is committing Domestic Violence. If you are experiencing Domestic Violence, you have a legal right to seek relief from the courts by procuring a protective order.

In the State of Arizona, Domestic Violence includes a variety of abusive acts. You must be able to show the court that the person from whom you want protection has committed or may commit an act of Domestic Violence. You do not have to be physically injured or hurt to be a victim of Domestic Violence. Domestic violence occurs if the other person has done or attempts to:

  • endanger you threaten, intimidate, or harass you interfere with the custody of your children;
  • trespass on or damage your property;
  • restrain you, kidnap, or hold you prisoner;
  • assault you with his/her body or with a weapon;
  • display a deadly weapon or threaten you with a deadly weapon;
  • surreptitiously (without your knowledge) photograph, videotape, film or record you.

2. What types of protective orders are available in Arizona? A Protective Order is a document obtained from a court, to order the abusive person not to contact you and to prevent future abusive behavior. In Arizona there are five types of protective orders:

  • Order of Protection – An Order of Protection is a legal restraint used to prohibit a person from committing acts of domestic violence or from contacting people protected by the order. It also provides several kinds of protective relief, such as removing firearms from the home, adding other people to the protective order, and exclusive use of the home.
  • Emergency Order of Protection – An Emergency Order of Protection is also a legal restraint to prevent domestic violence. An Emergency Order may be granted by an authorized judicial officer in writing, verbally or by telephone for the protection of a person in “imminent and present danger of domestic violence.”
  • Release Order – In rural counties where it is not required that a judicial officer be designated to issue Emergency Orders when the courts are closed, emergency protection is available through a registered Release Order. Arizona law provides that, when a person arrested for an act of domestic violence is released from custody, any Release Order shall include pretrial release conditions necessary to protect the alleged victim and other specifically designated persons.
  • Injunction Against Harassment – The Injunction Against Harassment orders a person to stop harassing, annoying or alarming another person. Injunctions can be used for disputes against neighbors, strangers, and people who were not dating.
  • Injunction Against Workplace Harassment – The Injunction Against Workplace Harassment is the newest protective order available in Arizona. It allows an employer or an agent of an employer to file for relief on behalf of all employees at the workplace, against any person who enters the employer’s property and any person who is performing official work duties.

3. How and where can I get an Order of Protection or an Injunction Against Harassment? You may file a petition for an Order of Protection or Injunction Against Harassment in any superior, municipal or justice court regardless of where you live in Arizona. When you enter the court, go to the Clerk of the Court’s counter, Self Service Center, or protection order window and tell the clerk you are requesting an Order of Protection or an Injunction Against Harassment. The clerk will give you the proper Petition forms. Plan on being at the court house for several hours.

If you’re experiencing domestic violence, hiring a family law attorney can be critical to your future. Call the Scottsdale layers at Canterbury Law Group today to schedule you consultation. 480-744-7711.

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Written by Canterbury Law Group

4 American Trends that Affect Divorce

The divorce attorneys at Canterbury Law Group have extensive industry experience and are authorities on the evolving trends in the divorce area. Similar to nearly everything in life and the law, divorce has changed with the times and will continue to do so.

Contrary to popular belief; the divorce rate in the United States is declining. After peaking in 1980 with 22.6 divorces per 1,000 married women, aged 15 and older in the U.S., the rate has been going down ever since. In 2009, there were 16.9 divorces per 1,000 married women. However, what’s really happening is that there are fewer marriages overall. Fewer marriages translate into fewer opportunities to get divorced—and that equals declining divorce rates.

Here are four trends in society that are affecting divorce rates:

1. The surge in cohabitation ended. The number of cohabiting couples grew from 400,000 in 1960 to 3.8 million in 2000. But since then, rates of cohabitation have leveled off. About 12 to 14 percent of never-married adults lived together with a partner in 2008-2010, essentially unchanged since 2000.

2. People are delaying marriage longer than ever before. The percentage of women aged 20 to 24 who have ever married declined from 31 percent in 2000 to 19 percent in 2008-2010. For men, the percentage dropped from 21 to 11 percent.

3. Americans are increasingly jumping on the “marriage-go-round.” More Americans are going from marriage to divorce to remarriage, sometimes multiple times. Among currently married men, those who are remarried increased from 17 percent in 1980 to 25 percent in 2008-2010. The changes for women are similar.

4. Who are most likely to have “traditional” families in America? Immigrants. Regardless of education and race or ethnicity, immigrants tend to be married at a higher rate, are less likely to cohabit (except for Hispanics), and divorce and remarry at a lower percentage when compared with their U.S.-born counterparts.

If you’re contemplating divorce, hiring a great divorce layer can be critical to your future. Call the Scottsdale divorce layers at Canterbury Law Group today to schedule you consultation. 480-744-7711.

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Written by Canterbury Law Group

Steps in the Scottsdale Divorce Process

The Scottsdale divorce lawyers at Canterbury Law Group have represented hundreds of clients in Scottsdale divorce cases. It is common to discuss the first steps in the divorce process during the initial legal consultation. Although every case is unique, there are certain stages in divorce that everyone can expect:

1. File a Petition – One must file a Petition for Dissolution of Marriage, which is a public record that includes basic facts about you, your spouse and your children.

2. Spouse is “Served” – Once the Petition is filed with the Court, due process requires that the Respondent be “served” with the Petition along with a Summons to Appear. Once served, your spouse has 30 days to file a Response to the Petition.

3. Financial Support – Representing lawyers discuss if financial support is needed during the divorce case, including child support, maintenance and marital expenses.

4. Agree on Estate – Both parties partake in financial investigation, which involves determination of the value of the marital estate or “discovery,” which includes depositions, subpoenas, interrogatories and review of financial documents by accounting experts. If the assets and debts are agreeable by both parties, they may choose to waive formal discovery. If both parties cannot reach an agreement, the attorneys may choose to submit the issues in controversy to the Judge during a pretrial conference. Pretrial conferences are conducted in the Judge’s chambers.

The Scottsdale divorce attorneys at Canterbury Law Group have represented women and men, young and old, in their complicated divorce cases. To discuss your options in a Scottsdale divorce, call today to schedule a consultation.

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Written by Canterbury Law Group

Crowdfunding Site Adds a Divorce Registry

The divorce attorneys at Canterbury Law Group are authorities on the evolving trends of divorce. Not only do the Phoenix divorce lawyers observe the progression of legal issues, but they have also witnessed the changes in perception of divorce.

Today, divorce holds less of a stigma in our culture than it has in the past. For example, divorce selfies, in which couples post happy photos of themselves on social media to celebrate their split, and divorce parties, where a newly single person either throws or is thrown a party to celebrate the end of their marriage, are a few of the popular divorce trends we see emphasized on social media.

The Phoenix divorce attorneys have also noted that crowdfunding site, Plumfund, has created a new, dedicated divorce registry for marriage break-up expenses. With online fundraising being such a popular option to raise funds in modern-day society, this is an area that we expect to see even further expansion in.

Plumfund’s simplified online fundraising and gift registry platform has made creating a divorce registry easier and more convenient than ever. Simply create a Plumfund divorce registry and spread the word to the divorcee’s friends and family. The registry allows people going through a divorce or their friends and family to raise money for expenses such as new furniture, legal fees and child custody. All of the gift money is easily accessed through PayPal or WePay. All personal information is kept private and safe, and is never sold or rented to a third party. The divorce category launched this March, and there are currently 114 active divorce registries on the site.

No matter what the newest divorce trends are, divorce tends to be a difficult process for all involved. The legal team at Canterbury Law Group is dedicated to diligently and compassionately solving clients’ life changing problems. If you are considering divorce, call us today to schedule your consultation.

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Written by Canterbury Law Group

Determining the Value of your Marital Estate

The divorce lawyers at Canterbury Law Group often see a spouse beginning a divorce without any clue of knowing the true value of their marital estate. Many spouses do not even have account access or numbers to the earning spouse.Fear not. Even if you are completely unaware of your family finances, when you file for divorce the time to finally and accurately determine all marriage assets will have arrived. Your Canterbury lawyers will make sure this happens. It’s the law. It’s not up to him or her.

Because Arizona is a community property jurisdiction, generally speaking, spouses own equally almost all property and debt acquired during the marriage, regardless of whose name is on it. Also, half of each partner’s income earned during the marriage is owned by the other partner, as well as debts incurred during the marriage are debts of the couple together. Do not let your spouse bully you—or suggest “they will leave you with nothing” if you challenge them in the divorce. They are not just bullying, they are plain wrong—under the law.

The “discovery” phase of your divorce case is used to determine information, including assets and values from the other side. In Arizona, court rules require mandatory disclosure by each side of any information that may impact their case. Therefore, your spouse must voluntarily provide you all such information, even without a specific request. However, relying on your spouse’s good will in adhering to this rule is not enough in many divorce cases. If informal requests for financial details go unanswered, or you do not feel confident you are receiving accurate information, you do have alternatives in gathering this information. Your Canterbury lawyers will be critical in unpeeling the complex layers of your family estate—and locating assets, by any means lawfully allowed—to maximize your recovery at trial.

1. Tax Returns. Personal, corporate and partnership tax returns can help in identifying property, accounts and assets sold during a given tax period. If your spouse is not forthcoming with copies of returns, or you believe the returns given to you are not the actual returns filed, you can request copies from the Internal Revenue Service.

2. Court Issued Subpoenas. A subpoena can be issued to a person or entity not a part of your lawsuit, including financial institutions and employers. The recipient of the subpoena legally has up to thirty days to physically produce the information requested. When issuing a subpoena to a financial institution, your spouse’s name and social security number is all that is needed in most cases to obtain information on accounts on which that social security number or name appears. Subpoenas to employers may work to obtain details including as history of pay, bonus information, employment terms and benefit information, such as retirement, pension, employee savings and stock option accounts. Bank statements and paystubs do not lie—your spouse can. By getting the documents up front, we can catch them in their lies.

3. Additional Legal Discovery Tools. If additional information is needed to determine the value of your marriage, there are other discovery tools that require responses given under oath:

  • Interrogatories – written questions to your spouse
  • Skip Trace investigations onto the “financial grid” to locate any assets linked to his or her social security number and date of birth. Assets at home, and abroad, can be located.
  • Requests for Production of Documents – written requests to obtain certain documents
  • Requests for Admissions – written questions to your spouse asking that he or she to admit certain facts as true
  • Depositions – oral question and answer sessions at which your attorney asks questions of your spouse while under oath, or an expert witness, or sometimes a third party in the presence of a court reporter, from whom a written transcript of the questions and answers can be obtained and the testimony is preserved for trial.

4. Outside Experts. In the unfortunate cases where a spouse is hiding assets or has engaged in pre-divorce planning, the hiring of third party specialists might be necessary in order to obtain the necessary information. Experts such as private investigators, asset location specialists and computer forensic professionals may be able to help you and your Canterbury team find the truth and get you paid.

When your family and livelihood are at stake in your divorce, it is critical to be prepared with a highly skilled team of litigation attorneys on your side. Canterbury Law Group was founded to provide no-nonsense legal counsel for Phoenix divorce cases at the highest level possible. We are an energetic and unified team of lawyers and paralegals deeply committed to your needs. Call now for an initial consultation. 480-744-7711.

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Written by Canterbury Law Group

Child Custody During Summer Months

Canterbury Law Group handles various family law matters, including divorce and child custody. Family law is a complex legal area requiring measured and detailed strategy and execution as well as constant upkeep. If you have children with an ex, it’s time to consider future summer vacations and your custody agreement. At Canterbury Law Group, we have many ways to help you keep the legal peace with your ex and enjoy a great summer vacation with your kids.

1. Set Up a Vacation Schedule, And Stick to It. With the kids off from school, there’s plenty of time to plan for vacations and trips. However, it is essential to discuss you plans with your ex. It is typically beneficial to create a vacation schedule with your child custody lawyer, have your ex sign off on it and submit it to a family court judge. By doing this, both parties are clear on where the kids will be and it’s in writing with the court.

2. Be Sure You Don’t Violate Your Custody Agreement. Often, custody and / or visitation agreements have geographical limits, such as your kids can’t leave the state or country. If you’re planning a summer vacation abroad, you may need to have your agreement modified. If you and your ex have already created a vacation plan, it shouldn’t be too difficult to have your ex agree to a custody modification that allows for travel.

3. Use Open Communication. If you have to alter your vacation schedule, notify your ex spouse immediately. In fact, it is always a good idea to notify the other parent of your vacation plans or any change in plans. If you do not inform your ex of your travel plans, be prepared for possible legal action against you. The courts will want a detailed explanation as to why you wouldn’t give up the information and a judge will typically order a parent to divulge vacation plans for safety reasons.

4. Let Kids Communicate With Your Ex While on Vacation. Summer vacation doesn’t mean a communication ban from the other parent. Video calls with Face time or Skype may be a great way to allow your ex “virtual visitation”.

If you need assistance with modifying your child custody agreement for the summer, call us today to schedule a consultation. 480-744-7711. www.canterburylawgroup.com

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Written by Canterbury Law Group

Legal Trends in Divorce

Divorce has been around for centuries, but it is by no means a stagnant concept. Similar to nearly everything in life and the law, divorce has changed with the times and will continue to do so. The family attorneys at Canterbury Law Group are on the forefront of these evolving divorce trends.

1. Decreasing Marriage Rate – Less Divorces – Contrary to popular belief; the divorce rate in the United States is declining. After peaking in 1980 with 22.6 divorces per 1,000 married women, aged 15 and older in the U.S., the rate has been going down ever since. In 2009, there were 16.9 divorces per 1,000 married women. However, what’s really happening is that there are fewer marriages overall as more couples are choosing to live together instead of get married. Fewer marriages translate into fewer opportunities to get divorced—and that equals declining divorce rates.

2. Increase in “Grey divorce” – Although the overall divorce rate is declining, the 50+ age group is seeing a dramatic rise in marital breaks. According to the National Center for Family and Marriage Research, which coined the term, “the divorce rate among adults ages 50 and older doubled between 1990 and 2010.” In fact, one in four people getting divorced today is 50 or older. The growing phenomenon even has a name to describe it: “the grey divorce revolution.” One possible explanation for the increase in divorce in older couples is the fact that there are simply so many baby boomers out there. Another factor could be that second and subsequent marriages have a higher divorce rate than first marriages—and those who have had several marriages are often older in general.

3. Mandatory Divorce Classes – While state laws vary greatly regarding divorce from no-fault provisions to “cooling off” waiting periods, nearly all states now offer courses or seminars to divorcing couples, especially those with children, according to the Association of Family and Conciliation Courts. In many states, attendance is mandatory before a court will grant the divorce of parents in particular. Such classes may include meetings with a therapist, watching videos, or role-playing.

Whether you are considering filing for divorce or you’ve already been served with a divorce petition, it is critical to speak with an attorney immediately to assess your legal rights and take the necessary steps to protect them. Delay may result in limiting your options. Every situation is unique and the Scottsdale attorneys at Canterbury Law Group are well equipped to provide you with the tools to make the best decision that suits your particular situation.

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Criminal Conduct May Lead to Losing Marital Property

Arizona, California, Idaho, Louisiana, Texas, Nevada, New Mexico and Washington are community property states, meaning assets acquired during the marriage are typically divided equally when a couple divorces. However, this is commonly misinterpreted in that both parties must be awarded 50/50 on all community property and debts acquired during the marriage. This is not necessarily the case.

“Arizona divorce judges have the unfettered discretion to “equitably” allocate the martial estate as the judge deems warranted in any divorce case brought before him or her,” says Craig Cherney of Canterbury Law Group.

A recent case in New York is making headlines because the judge found that the husband’s criminal misconduct against the wife was sufficiently egregious to justify stripping him of all rights to the martial estate and awarding 100% of the property to the victim (wife.) “The same can happen in your case, if there is egregious or criminal conduct by one spouse against the other,” says Craig Cherney.

More About the Case at Hand

A man serving 40 years in state prison for raping his wife is not entitled to share her pension or any other marital asset in their divorce, a Brooklyn judge has determined.

State Supreme Court Justice Jeffrey Sunshine said the 2011 rape and other acts of violence and abuse by “Terrance T.” represent a rare instance where “egregious conduct” by one spouse toward another exempts the offending spouse from receiving any share of assets under equitable distribution.
Sunshine wrote that in a “civilized society,” the behavior of Terrance T. must be considered a bar under state Domestic Relations Law §236(B)(5) and §236(B)(6) to his receiving any marital assets from wife “Alice M.”

“The plaintiff, despite all she endured, compounded by the defendant’s steadfast attempt to interfere in her desire to move on, has displayed both courage and perseverance beyond what any human being should have to endure, and so is noted by this court,” Sunshine wrote in Alice M. v. Terrance T., 2015 NY Slip Op 51913(U).

To read more visit http://www.newyorklawjournal.com/id=1202746302596/Judge-Denies-Inmates-Bid-for-Marital-Assets-in-Divorce#ixzz3wsqARTwU

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Written by Canterbury Law Group

More About Orders of Protection

As top Scottsdale divorce attorneys, the team at Canterbury Law Group receives many questions about Orders of Protection. Here are some common questions and answers for people looking for more information. If you’re in need of protection, contact Canterbury immediately – time is of the essence in these matters and any delays can be held against you by the court.

1. How can an order of protection help the victim? In an order of protection, a judicial officer can order:

  • The abuser not to commit any of the offenses included as domestic violence
  • The abuser to have no contact with you or with anyone else named in the order (this could include telephone calls, texts, letters, messages through someone else, personal contact, etc.)
  • The abuser to stay away from your residence, place of employment, and school or those of anyone else named in the order
  • One party to have exclusive use of a home shared by you and the abuser (if there is reasonable cause to believe that the abuser may cause you physical harm)
  • Law enforcement to accompany a party to a shared home to get his/her belongings
  • The abuser to turn in any firearms in his/her possession to law enforcement and not possess firearms
  • The abuser to stay away from and not harm any animal owned by you, the abuser or a minor child in either of your homes (and award you care and custody of the animal)
  • Other relief that is appropriate and necessary for your protection and the protection of anyone else specifically named in the order
  • The abuser to complete a domestic violence offender treatment program or any other program deemed appropriate by the court (as part of a final order)

2. In which county can I file for an order of protection? As an Arizona resident, you can file for a domestic violence protective order in any superior, municipal or justice court in any county in Arizona. The only exceptions are that:

  • If two courts are located within a one mile distance, then one court can be designated as the court which issues protective orders;
  • If you have filed an action for divorce, separation, paternity or annulment with the superior court (involving the same person from whom you want protection), then you need to return to the superior court to request an order of protection; and
  • If the defendant is less than 12 years of age, only the juvenile division of the superior court may issue the order or injunction.

If you have questions about your finances and / or bankruptcy, call us today to schedule a consultation at 480-744-7711 or [email protected]

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