Debt’s Emotional and Mental Toll

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Debt’s Emotional and Mental Toll

Debt – it is a word that can quickly cause anxiety for many Americans. Credit card debt continues to rise, reaching up to $420 billion in 2018. The average household has almost $7,000 in balances carried over to the next month. Credit card debt comes with high-interest rates, which makes it even harder to pay off.

Debt plays a serious role in the a person’s emotional and mental well being. The more debt an individual accumulates, the more likely they’ll deal with stress and anxiety of having to pay it off. Too much debt can take over your life.

If debt becomes too overwhelming, bankruptcy tends to be the last option. There is bankruptcy help in Scottsdale, but that might add a whole new level of stress and anxiety. So, if you’re going through debt right now, consider how it is affecting you emotionally and mentally.

Anxiety and Depression

A study done by Dr. John Gathergood of the University of Nottingham found that those in debt were twice as likely to undergo mental health problems, anxiety and depression included. If this becomes an issue, feelings of worry and hopelessness could arise, making the situation that much more difficult to get a grasp on.

Embarrassment

Admitting that you’re in debt can be embarrassing for some, especially if they’re in so much debt that bankruptcy is a realistic option. In society, money tends to be linked to our success. If you have it, you must be successful in life. If you don’t have it, then you’re not as successful.

With this mentality, many struggling with debt will hide it and act like they are okay financially. The issue is that this could lead to even more debt. They may say yes to expenses that they shouldn’t be in their situation. Plus, they could be avoiding the much-needed help friends and family could offer.

Frustration and Anger

Debt is frustrating. For some, it can be so frustrating that it makes them angry, especially if the debt is out of their control. Anger may arise if the debt was a result of losing a job, an unexpected expense, identity theft, or a serious illness or accident. Frustration tends to come when the debt is from previous years that you wish you wouldn’t have done. Either way though, this mentality won’t help your situation.  You may need to seriously consider your bankruptcy options.

Fear

When you live in debt, fear tends to be a common emotion that many feel. It’s the fear of wondering if you’ll be able to make your payments, pay for your mortgage or rent, put food on the table, ensure there is hot water and electricity in your home, or falling into bankruptcy.

Debt brings up many worries and the deeper in you go, the more the fear becomes apparent. Other fears can arise like the fear of wondering what you’ll do next, how you’ll get out of it, what people will think of you, and if you’ll be able to survive your debt.

If you’re struggling with debt, it’s essential that you watch how it is affecting your emotional and mental well being. The stress of debt can quickly take over your life. However, if you can avoid that from happening, you’ll be able to tackle your debt with a clear mind.  Bankruptcy can often clear the decks of almost all debt and give you a fresh start in life, and with your life’s well being.