Written by Canterbury Law Group

5 Types of Protective Orders in Arizona

Canterbury Law Group specializes in obtaining orders of protection in Scottsdale. In Arizona there are five types of protective orders:

Order of Protection – A person who believes her/his safety is in danger due to domestic violence or harassment can ask the court for an Order of Protection or an Injunction Against Harassment. An Order of Protection is a legal restraint used to prohibit a person from committing acts of domestic violence or from contacting people protected by the order. It also provides several kinds of protective relief, such as removing firearms from the home, adding other people to the protective order, and exclusive use of the home. However, it is only a piece of paper. You must also take steps to insure your safety.

Emergency Order of Protection – An Emergency Order of Protection is also a legal restraint to prevent domestic violence. An Emergency Order may be granted by an authorized judicial officer in writing, verbally or by telephone for the protection of a person in “imminent and present danger of domestic violence.” An Emergency Order may be used to order a person not to commit acts of domestic violence or contact people protected by the order. Similar to the Order of Protection, it also provides protective relief, such as exclusive use of the home and removing firearms from an abuser. Unless continued by the court, an Emergency Order is valid only until the close of the next day of judicial business following the day that the Emergency Order was issued.

Release Order -In rural counties where it is not required that a judicial officer be designated to issue Emergency Orders when the courts are closed, emergency protection is available through a registered Release Order. Arizona law provides that, when a person arrested for an act of domestic violence is released from custody, any Release Order shall include pretrial release conditions necessary to protect the alleged victim and other specifically designated persons. Within twenty-four hours after a defendant is arrested for an act of domestic violence, the court must forward a certified copy of the Release Order to the sheriff of the county in which the Order was issued for registration. The sheriff must maintain a central repository for Release Orders so the existence and validity of the Release Order may be easily verified. Law enforcement agencies are required to advise domestic violence victims where registration and the conditions of a Release Order may be verified. Faced with a violation of a Release Order, a victim may summon a peace officer to enforce the conditions of the Order against the defendant.

Injunction Against Harassment – The Injunction Against Harassment orders a person to stop harassing, annoying or alarming another person. Injunctions can be used for disputes against neighbors, strangers, and people who are or were dating. Harassment is defined as: “a series of acts over any period of time that is directed at a specific person….” The relationship between you and the other person determines which protective order will be used for your situation. The Injunction Against Harassment differs from the Order of Protection in that exclusive use of the home cannot be ordered and the police are not mandated to serve the Injunction.

What is the Injunction Against Workplace Harassment – The Injunction Against Workplace Harassment is the newest protective order available in Arizona. It allows an employer or an agent of an employer to file for relief on behalf of all employees at the workplace, any person who enters the employer’s property and any person who is performing official work duties. This allows the inclusion of numerous people under the protective umbrella of this Injunction, whereas the “personal” Injunction Against Harassment is usually between two people. Harassment for this injunction is defined as: “a single threat or act of physical harm or damage or a series of acts over a period of time that would cause a reasonable person to be seriously alarmed or annoyed.” A qualification was included which ensures that the employer may not seek an injunction primarily to accomplish a purpose for which it was not designed (i.e. prohibit free speech or other activities that are constitutionally or otherwise protected by law.)

It is essential to contact an attorney to evaluate and invoke your rights when dealing with domestic violence. Contact our Scottsdale lawyers today to schedule your consultation.

Written by Canterbury Law Group

Managing Out of State Court issued “Orders of Protection” While in Arizona

The family law attorneys at Canterbury Law Group in Scottsdale, AZ. help victims of domestic violence secure legal protection and navigate the way when dealing with out-of-state orders. They also help defend and quash false allegations from parents who wrongfully obtain orders of protection. If you’re looking to determine your legal options, the family law attorneys at Canterbury Law Group have extensive knowledge on orders of protection. Here are some answers to common questions:

1. Can an out-of-state order of protection be enforced in Arizona?

Yes. An order of protection can be enforced in Arizona as long as:

It was issued to prevent violent or threatening acts, harassment or sexual violence against another person, or it was issued to forbid contact or communication with another person or it was issued to order the abuser to stay away from another person.

The court that issued the order had jurisdiction over the people and case – (in other words, the court had the authority or power to hear the case.)

The abuser received notice of the order and had an opportunity to present his/her side of the story in court.

2. Can an out-of-state protection order be changed, extended, or canceled in Arizona?

Only the state that issued your protection order can change, extend, or cancel the order. You cannot have this done by a court in Arizona. To have your order changed, extended, or canceled, you will have to file a motion or petition in the court where the order was issued. You may be able to request that you attend the court hearing by telephone rather than in person, so that you do not need to return to the state where your abuser is living.

If your order does expire while you are living in Arizona, you may be able to get a new one issued in Arizona but this may be challenging if no new incidents of abuse have occurred in Arizona. To find out more information on how to get a protective order in Arizona, visit our AZ Domestic Violence Orders of Protection page at www.canterburylawgroup.com

3. If granted temporary custody with a protection order, will you still have temporary custody of your children in AZ?

As long as the child custody provision complies with certain state and federal laws, Arizona can enforce a temporary custody order that is a part of a protection order and make it an order of an Arizona court depending on the facts and legal issues presented.

The family law team at Canterbury Law Group will help you and your loved ones stay safe. Call us today to schedule your consultation. 480-240-0040 or [email protected]

Written by Canterbury Law Group

Scottsdale Domestic Violence: Civil Law and Criminal Law

The attorneys at Canterbury Law Group help clients obtain orders of protection in Scottsdale. We also assist in determining if your domestic violence case is a civil or criminal case.
In domestic violence situations, there may be both civil and criminal matters occurring at the same time as a result of the same violent act. You may want to pursue both civil and criminal actions for maximum protection. The major differences have to do with who takes the case to court, the reason for the case, and the possible penalties.

  • Civil Law – In a civil domestic violence action, you are asking the court to protect you from the person abusing you. You are not asking the court to send that person to jail for committing a crime. However, if the abuser violates the civil court order, s/he may be sent to jail for the violation. In a civil case, you are the person bringing the case against the abuser and (in most circumstances), you have the right to withdraw (drop) the case if you want to. A Scottsdale order of protection is requested in civil court. Once granted, they usually are valid for a period of one year and they sometimes can be renewed by the person originally obtained the order of protection.
  • Criminal Law – In stark contrast, the criminal law system handles all cases that involve violations of criminal law such as harassment, assault, murder, theft, etc. As such, only the government, via the local prosecutor or grand jury can make the final decision to “bring charges” against the bad actor who has engaged in bad acts.
    A criminal complaint involves your abuser being charged with a crime. In a criminal case, the prosecutor (also called the district attorney) is the one who has control over whether the case against the abuser continues or not. It is the county/state who has brought the case against the abuser, not the victim. It is possible that if you do not want the case to continue (if you do not want to “press charges”), the prosecutor might decide to drop the criminal charges but this is not necessarily true. The prosecutor can also continue to prosecute the abuser against your wishes and can even issue a subpoena (a court order) to force you to testify at the trial live under oath.

It is essential to contact an attorney to evaluate and invoke your rights when dealing with domestic violence either when allegations are brought against you, or where you bring them against another. Contact our Scottsdale lawyers today to schedule your consultation. www.clgaz.com 480-240-0040.

Written by Canterbury Law Group

Campus Dating Violence and Orders of Protection

During the school season, many college co-eds, and parents of college-age kids, have questions about dating violence on campus. Dating violence is emotional, psychological, physical, sexual or financial abuse (or, sometimes, a combination of these) perpetrated over a sustained period of time in order to gain and/or maintain power and control in a dating relationship.

In an effort to negate dating violence, schools should maintain a robust dating violence, domestic violence, stalking and sexual assault prevention program for all incoming students and staff, with continuing education for older students throughout their time at the university.

The family law attorneys at Canterbury Law Group in Scottsdale, AZ. help victims of domestic violence secure legal protection against further abuse, whether on campus or off. If you’re looking to determine your legal options, the family law attorneys at Canterbury Law Group have extensive knowledge on orders of protection. Here are some quick facts:

  • A victim of domestic abuse means a person protected by the law and shall include any person who has been subjected to domestic abuse by a spouse, or any other person who is a present or former household member and where the victim is 18 years of age or older or who is an emancipated minor.
  • An order of protection is a court order intended to protect you from further harm from someone who has hurt you; to keep the abuser away from you, or to stop harassing you, or keep the abuser from the scene of the violence, which may include your home, place of work, or apartment. It is a civil order and it does not give the abuser a criminal record. An order of protection can prohibit third parties from constantly texting you or emailing you without consent.
  • If you are a victim of violence, a judge can sign an order that requires the abuser to obey the court. The protective order is very specific in as far as what the abuser can and can’t do, including having no contact in person or by phone, at home, work, or almost anywhere you ask the court to put in the order.

The family law team at Canterbury Law Group will help you and your loved ones stay safe. Call us today to schedule your consultation. 480-240-0040

Written by Canterbury Law Group

Johnny Depp Hearings Shine Spotlight on Abuse

The legal problems between Johnny Depp and Amber Heard over her claims of spousal abuse have been making international headlines. The two sides are due to face off as Heard pursues an extension of a domestic violence restraining order that was granted last month. The court set a status conference for August and the judge extended the temporary restraining order that bars Depp from going within 100 yards of Heard.

This celebrity case has raised the importance of protection against domestic violence. At Canterbury Law Group, we know first hand that there are many misconceptions on abuse. If you or someone you know is experiencing domestic violence, here are some answers to common questions:

1. What is Domestic Violence? When you are in a relationship with someone who uses threats, harasses, molests, stalks, attacks, batters or strikes you, your family or your children, that person is committing Domestic Violence. If you are experiencing Domestic Violence, you have a legal right to seek relief from the courts by procuring a protective order.

In the State of Arizona, Domestic Violence includes a variety of abusive acts. You must be able to show the court that the person from whom you want protection has committed or may commit an act of Domestic Violence. You do not have to be physically injured or hurt to be a victim of Domestic Violence. Domestic violence occurs if the other person has done or attempts to:

  • endanger you threaten, intimidate, or harass you interfere with the custody of your children;
  • trespass on or damage your property;
  • restrain you, kidnap, or hold you prisoner;
  • assault you with his/her body or with a weapon;
  • display a deadly weapon or threaten you with a deadly weapon;
  • surreptitiously (without your knowledge) photograph, videotape, film or record you.

2. What types of protective orders are available in Arizona? A Protective Order is a document obtained from a court, to order the abusive person not to contact you and to prevent future abusive behavior. In Arizona there are five types of protective orders:

  • Order of Protection – An Order of Protection is a legal restraint used to prohibit a person from committing acts of domestic violence or from contacting people protected by the order. It also provides several kinds of protective relief, such as removing firearms from the home, adding other people to the protective order, and exclusive use of the home.
  • Emergency Order of Protection – An Emergency Order of Protection is also a legal restraint to prevent domestic violence. An Emergency Order may be granted by an authorized judicial officer in writing, verbally or by telephone for the protection of a person in “imminent and present danger of domestic violence.”
  • Release Order – In rural counties where it is not required that a judicial officer be designated to issue Emergency Orders when the courts are closed, emergency protection is available through a registered Release Order. Arizona law provides that, when a person arrested for an act of domestic violence is released from custody, any Release Order shall include pretrial release conditions necessary to protect the alleged victim and other specifically designated persons.
  • Injunction Against Harassment – The Injunction Against Harassment orders a person to stop harassing, annoying or alarming another person. Injunctions can be used for disputes against neighbors, strangers, and people who were not dating.
  • Injunction Against Workplace Harassment – The Injunction Against Workplace Harassment is the newest protective order available in Arizona. It allows an employer or an agent of an employer to file for relief on behalf of all employees at the workplace, against any person who enters the employer’s property and any person who is performing official work duties.

3. How and where can I get an Order of Protection or an Injunction Against Harassment? You may file a petition for an Order of Protection or Injunction Against Harassment in any superior, municipal or justice court regardless of where you live in Arizona. When you enter the court, go to the Clerk of the Court’s counter, Self Service Center, or protection order window and tell the clerk you are requesting an Order of Protection or an Injunction Against Harassment. The clerk will give you the proper Petition forms. Plan on being at the court house for several hours.

If you’re experiencing domestic violence, hiring a family law attorney can be critical to your future. Call the Scottsdale layers at Canterbury Law Group today to schedule you consultation. 480-240-0040.

Written by Canterbury Law Group

Restraining Orders and Orders of Protection in Scottsdale

Survivors of domestic violence have several civil and criminal options to protect themselves from further abuse. If you’re looking to determine your legal options, the family law attorneys at Canterbury Law Group have extensive knowledge on orders of protection in Scottsdale and restraining orders in Scottsdale.

Our attorneys operate in many areas of family law, including helping clients obtain a restraining order in Scottsdale. If you’re considering getting legal help, here are common questions you might ask.

1. What is a restraining order? A restraining order is a court order intended to protect you from further harm from someone who has hurt you; to keep the abuser away from you, or to stop harassing you, or keep the abuser from the scene of the violence, which may include your home, place of work, or apartment. It is a civil order and it does not give the abuser a criminal record.

2. Who can get a restraining order? A victim of domestic violence can obtain a restraining order. A victim of domestic abuse means a person protected by the law and shall include any person who has been subjected to domestic abuse by a spouse, or any other person who is a present or former household member and where the victim is 18 years of age or older or who is an emancipated minor.

3. What does a restraining order do? If you are a victim of domestic violence, a judge can sign an order that requires the abuser to obey the court. The protective order is very specific in as far as what the abuser can and can’t do.

  • The abuser can be ordered not to have any contact with you, in person or by phone, text or emails at home, work, or almost anywhere you ask the court to put in the order.
  • The court can order the abuser to leave the house or apartment that you and the abuser share; even if it is in the abuser’s name.
  • Except in unusual situations, the court may grant you custody of your minor children. In some states, the court can also order the abuser to pay child support and support for you. The abuser may also be granted visitation with the child/children under certain conditions. If the children are in danger of abuse, let the judge know.
  • In some states the court may also order the abuser to pay for costs that resulted from the abuse, for example; household bills that are due right away, medical/dental treatment, moving expenses, loss of earnings. The judge can also make the abuser pay your attorney’s fees, and can make the abuser pay damages to you or other people that helped you or got hurt by the abuser.
  • The judge may order the abuser to receive professional domestic violence counseling.
  • The judge can order the police to escort the abuser to remove personal items from the residence, or shared place of business so that you are protected by the police during any necessary contact.
  • The judge has the power under the law to order anything else that will help to protect you, as long as you agree to it.

If you need an order of protection in Scottsdale Arizona, Canterbury Law Group can help you. Contact us today to schedule a consultation. 480-240-0040.

Written by Canterbury Law Group

Order of Protection Used to Stop Domestic Violence

The Scottsdale attorneys at Canterbury Law Group help survivors of domestic violence utilize legal protection options to defend themselves from further abuse, including obtaining an order of protection. An order of protection is long term, typically for one to five years, and in extreme circumstances, for up to a lifetime. A victim can also renew the order of protection if he or she still feels threatened by his or her abuser.

An order of protection may include many different provisions, including:

  • No Contact Provision – Prohibiting the abuser from calling, texting, emailing, stalking, attacking, hitting, or disturbing the victim
  • Peaceful Contact Provision – Permitting the abuser to peacefully communicate with the victim for limited reasons, including care and transfer for visitation of their child
  • No Contact Provision – Prohibiting the abuser from calling, texting, emailing, stalking, attacking, hitting, or disturbing the victim
  • Stay Away Provision – Ordering the abuser to stay at least a certain number of yards or feet away from the victim, his or her home, job, school, and car. The stay-away distance can vary by state, judge or the lethality of the situation, but is often at least 100 yards or 300 feet
  • Move Out Provision – Requiring the abuser to move out of a home shared with the victim
  • Firearms Provision – Requiring the abuser to surrender any guns he or she possesses (about 2/3rds of states) and/or prohibiting the abuser from purchasing a firearm
  • Counseling Provision – Ordering the abuser to attend counseling, such as batterer’s intervention or anger management

Order of protections may also include children, other family members, roommates or current romantic partners of the victim. This means the same no contact and stay away rules apply to any other listed individual, even if the direct harm was to the victim. Some states allow pets to be protected by the same order, as abusers may harm pets to torment their victims.

If you’re in need of protection, call us today to start the process of filing for an order or protection. Or if you have been recently served with an order of protection, and you feel wrongfully accused, you need to speak to a lawyer immediately. Delaying your response to an order of protection only makes it more challenging to have it quashed by a judge in court later. 480—240-0040. www.canterburylawgroup.com

Written by Canterbury Law Group

Requirements for Obtaining a Restraining Order

The Scottsdale divorce attorneys at Canterbury Law Group frequently represent clients when obtaining or defending restraining orders. If you are contemplating obtaining a restraining order, your situation must fit the criteria listed below. It is also important to note that a judge cannot give you a restraining order solely for threats, rude behavior, verbal or emotional abuse or damaged property unless you were in fear that you were about to be physically injured.

  • Age. You are at least 18 years old, or you are younger than 18 but the person who abused you is 18 or older. You are (or were) married to that person, or 2) you have been in a sexual relationship with that person. If you are over 18 and were protected by a restraining order as a child and that order is still in effect, you may ask the court to continue that order even if the person who asked for it does not want it extended.
  • Relationship. The person who abused you is: 1) your husband, wife or domestic partner; or 2) your former husband, wife or domestic partner; or 3) an adult with whom you are living (or did live) in a sexual relationship; or 4) an adult with whom you have been in a sexual relationship in the last two years; or 5) an adult related to you by blood, marriage (caution: legal marriage in this context is distinct from co-habitation) or adoption; or 6) the parent of your child.
  • What is meant by “abuse”? If in the last 180 days, the person you wish to restrain has: physically injured you; or tried to physically injure you; or made you afraid that he or she was about to physically injure you or made you have sexual relations against your wishes by using force or threats of force. (Note that any time period in which the person who abused you was in jail or lived more than 100 miles from your home does not count as part of the 180-day period. This means you may still be able to get a restraining order even if it has been more than 180 days since you were abused.)
  • Ongoing Danger. You are in danger of more abuse very soon, and the person who abused you is a threat to the physical safety of you or your children.

The legal team at Canterbury Law Group can help you navigate the legal procedures for your restraining order. Alternatively, if you have been served with a restraining order against you, we can help you invoke your right to an evidentiary hearing to have the order quashed. Contact us today to schedule your consultation. 480-240-0040.

Written by Canterbury Law Group

More About Orders of Protection

As top Scottsdale divorce attorneys, the team at Canterbury Law Group receives many questions about Orders of Protection. Here are some common questions and answers for people looking for more information. If you’re in need of protection, contact Canterbury immediately – time is of the essence in these matters and any delays can be held against you by the court.

1. How can an order of protection help the victim? In an order of protection, a judicial officer can order:

  • The abuser not to commit any of the offenses included as domestic violence
  • The abuser to have no contact with you or with anyone else named in the order (this could include telephone calls, texts, letters, messages through someone else, personal contact, etc.)
  • The abuser to stay away from your residence, place of employment, and school or those of anyone else named in the order
  • One party to have exclusive use of a home shared by you and the abuser (if there is reasonable cause to believe that the abuser may cause you physical harm)
  • Law enforcement to accompany a party to a shared home to get his/her belongings
  • The abuser to turn in any firearms in his/her possession to law enforcement and not possess firearms
  • The abuser to stay away from and not harm any animal owned by you, the abuser or a minor child in either of your homes (and award you care and custody of the animal)
  • Other relief that is appropriate and necessary for your protection and the protection of anyone else specifically named in the order
  • The abuser to complete a domestic violence offender treatment program or any other program deemed appropriate by the court (as part of a final order)

2. In which county can I file for an order of protection? As an Arizona resident, you can file for a domestic violence protective order in any superior, municipal or justice court in any county in Arizona. The only exceptions are that:

  • If two courts are located within a one mile distance, then one court can be designated as the court which issues protective orders;
  • If you have filed an action for divorce, separation, paternity or annulment with the superior court (involving the same person from whom you want protection), then you need to return to the superior court to request an order of protection; and
  • If the defendant is less than 12 years of age, only the juvenile division of the superior court may issue the order or injunction.

If you have questions about your finances and / or bankruptcy, call us today to schedule a consultation at 480-240-0040 or [email protected]

Written by Canterbury Law Group

Deciphering Orders of Protection

Survivors of domestic violence have several civil lawsuit options to protect themselves from future abuse. At Canterbury Law Group, we often help clients navigate through these options to maximize their personal safety and security.

Emergency Protection Order – In some states, the police can give the victim (or person believed to be the victim) an Emergency Protection Order (EPO). An EPO is a short-term protection order typically given to a victim by the police or magistrate when his or her abuser is arrested for domestic violence. The EPO is generally for limited period, such as three or seven days. This permits the victim time with an EPO in place to request a longer-term protection order.

Order of Protection – All 50 states and the District of Columbia have statutes for some form of protective order. However, states call these orders different things such as protective orders, orders of protection and injunction for protection against domestic violence or injunctions against harassment.

A protective order is different from an EPO because it is longer term, typically for one to five years, and in extreme circumstances, for up to a lifetime. A victim can renew the protection order, if he or she still feels threatened by his or her abuser.

Protective orders may include children, other family members, roommates, or current romantic partners of the victim. This means the same “no contact” and “stay away” rules apply to the other listed individuals, even if the direct harm was to the victim. Some states allow pets to be protected by the same order, as abusers may harm pets to torment their victims.

Restraining Order – A restraining order is judge imposed court order requiring parties involved in a lawsuit to do or not do certain things. It may be part of a family law case, such as a divorce, or other civil codes. Restraining orders may be requested “ex parte” meaning that one party asks the court to do something without telling the other party. If the restraining order is granted ex parte, than the other party is later permitted a hearing to present their side of the story. This is often the process for protective orders also. As restraining orders also vary by state, it’s important to consult with an attorney familiar with the law where you live. Go to www.canterburylawgroup.com for more information.

1 2