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Prenups are in Higher Demand Among Millennials

Millennials are a lot more likely than their parents to require a prenuptial agreement prior to walking down the aisle. This generation also has fewer qualms about getting a prenuptial than their parents’ generation, according to the latest survey data from the American Academy of Matrimonial Lawyers (“AAML”). The AAML found that more than half of attorneys polled recently said that more millennials have requested prenuptial agreements. Only a small 2 percent of lawyers said that they had seen a decrease in millennial prenups.

A Rising Trend

Unlike their baby boom parents, millennials are less likely to view marriage through rose-colored glasses. Millenials are getting married later in life on average compared to their parents. Not only are millennial soon-to-be-married couples older, they have also had time to accumulate significant assets that they will not want to lose in case of a subsequent divorce.

Interestingly enough, it’s the millennial women who are driving the rising trend among would-be spouses demanding prenups. In the past, a prenup involved an often-wealthy groom asking the bride-to-be to sign an agreement. Prenups were more common among families with money, but now individual wealth can be the deciding factor.  This is particularly true in technology and startup companies where one spouse-to-be has accumulated significant stock and stock options prior to marriage.

What Millennials Want to Protect with Prenups

It was the norm for prenups to once protect inherited wealth. Not anymore, at least not significantly with the millennial generation. What millennials want to protect the most with a prenup is intellectual property, according to Bloomberg. Rather than protecting the family farm against a divorce, millennial spouses want to protect software, apps, songs, films, or screenplays. Interestingly, most of these assets are not even in existence when the couple gets married. What millennials really want is to protect future assets, especially creative ideas, from divorce proceedings.

Millennials included in the AAML survey responded that the most common reason for getting a prenup is the “protection of separate property.” The other two factors that mattered the most were spousal support or alimony and the division of property.

After intellectual property, millennial couples also increasingly include real estate holdings in the agreements. The “millennial prenups” are rather new. However, millennials can specifically request a prenup agreement that includes potential assets from a divorce attorney in Scottsdale.

Taking Stigma Away from Prenups

As millennials start requesting more prenups from their partners, the stigma surrounding such agreements could soon largely disappear. It used to be that couples didn’t want to discuss assets before getting hitched. It’s possible that millennials are learning from the mistakes of their parents, who were more likely to divorce than their own parents. Perhaps getting married later in life makes couples cognizant that not all marriages last a lifetime, but sometimes only a decade, or less.  Moreover, for couples who do not have children, the property disposition during a divorce can be even more important.

However, millennials do not need to worry about divorces like their parents did. The divorce rates are actually in decline nationally. It’s definitely a sign of changing times, or rather, being aware of the facts when getting married.

Many experts do agree that prenuptial agreements in general can be healthy for couples getting married. These agreements can protect individuals against acrimonious and expensive divorce proceedings later in life.  It set’s the couple’s mutual expectations early in the marriage, and no illusions are in place about what happens years later in the event of divorce.

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