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Written by Canterbury Law Group

Uncontested Divorce Costs 2021

Types of Divorce in Arizona

Divorce is not only an emotionally draining experience, but it can also be financially draining if you aren’t prepared and don’t consider all of your options. You can apply for an uncontested divorce if you and your spouse agree on the divorce, the distribution of your assets, and the care of your children, including custody, visitation, and child support.

If you’re considering divorce, you should be aware of the divorce procedure, your options, the length of time it will take to complete the legal proceedings, and the cost.

Without The Assistance Of An Attorney

You have a few options if you want to file for an uncontested divorce on your own. To begin, you and your spouse should fill out the necessary paperwork and submit it to your local family court. The court will then issue you with the necessary forms, such as a divorce petition and a parenting plan, which details your children’s care. You’ll appear in front of the court to finalize your divorce after filing your documents and waiting the time period necessary by your state’s laws. When filling out divorce forms, such as alimony, child support, and property division, make sure you know the laws in your state.

You could also use an online provider to petition for an uncontested divorce. In general, these services will guide you through the process of preparing and filing the divorce forms that your state requires. Check your state’s laws to see if filing for divorce online is allowed.

The cheapest option is to file for an uncontested divorce without the help of an attorney. Whether you file your documents yourself or with the help of an online service, you’ll have to pay around $300 to the court. In addition to the filing charge, using an online service can cost anywhere from $150 to $1,500, depending on the service and your specific situation.

With The Help Of A Lawyer

If you hire an attorney to represent you, he or she will fight for your rights and wants throughout the divorce process. If you have a complicated divorce or if you and your husband disagree on certain matters, hiring an attorney may be advantageous.

You can’t share an attorney with your soon-to-be ex because an attorney can only represent one spouse. Your lawyer will assist you in negotiating many areas of your divorce, such as property distribution, child custody, and debt settlements. Once all essential paperwork have been filed and a court date has been established, your attorney will accompany you to court and present your case to the judge for a final decision.

The cost of hiring an attorney for an uncontested divorce is cheaper than for a disputed divorce. However, if your case is more complicated or if it is a contested case, your attorney expenses will rise.

A retainer, or down payment, of $2,500 to $5,000 is usually required of your divorce attorney. Until the retainer money runs out, your attorney will charge you against it. You may be required to pay an extra retainer or your attorney may bill you by the hour after that. The average hourly legal cost is between $150 and $400.

Through the Process Of Collaboration

Collaborative divorce is a third option that has gained popularity in recent years. This sort of divorce is a cross between hiring an attorney and mediation, in which both spouses work together to solve their problems.

Each side in a collaborative divorce has an attorney who is conversant with the procedure. Each party promises to work together to solve their problems. If the parties are unable to reach an agreement on specific concerns, they may take their dispute to court. Depending on the intricacy of your case, a collaborative divorce can cost as little as $10,000.

You can acquire a divorce in a variety of methods, and the charges vary. Make sure to look into your state’s laws to see what options are open to you. If you and your husband/wife believe you can reach an agreement on important issues, an uncontested divorce may be the best option for you.

Need a Divorce Lawyer in Scottsdale or Phoenix?

As proven legal counsel in family court, we have a network of Arizona attorneys, expert witnesses, mediators, tax specialists, estate planners, financial planners, child specialists, real property appraisers, adult and child therapists and parenting coordinators who are here for you if you ever need them. Our lawyersdivorce mediators and collaborative divorce attorneys in Scottsdale are here to make your divorce less stressful and keep you in control and the costs contained. Call today for an initial consultation at 480-744-7711 or [email protected]. Our family lawyers can also help with divorce litigation, child custodylegal guardianshippaternityprenuptial agreements, and more.

*This information is not intended to be legal advice. Please contact Canterbury Law Group today to learn more about your personal legal needs.

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Written by Canterbury Law Group

How Much Does Divorce Mediation Cost

Divorce mediation Costs 2021

Learn how much divorce mediators charge on average and what factors can affect the cost of your divorce.

Private Divorce Mediation Costs

The cost of private mediation ranged from $3,000 to $8,000. The cost of a private mediator or mediation service varies depending on a number of factors, but the overall cost is normally between $3,000 and $8,000. (usually divided with your spouse).

Divorce is nearly usually a painful experience. However, it does not always have to be a protracted court struggle that causes further emotional and financial distress. Many couples have discovered that divorce mediation may assist them in deciding how to handle the practical aspects of their divorce, such as dividing their property and debts, child custody and visitation, child support, and alimony, in a way that reduces tension and promotes collaboration. It may also assist them in reducing the cost of divorce.

How Mediation Affects Divorce Costs

Couples who go through successful mediation—that is, mediation that results in a settlement agreement on all of the problems in a divorce—can avoid the high costs of a typical, combative divorce. People who mediate a divorce settlement are also less likely to go back to court after the divorce to request adjustments, such as a custody modification, according to research, which adds even more expenditure.

But how much does mediation itself set you back? That question does not have a clear response. The cost of divorce mediation, like the entire cost of divorce, is determined by a number of factors, which we’ll discuss below. The main price difference, however, is determined by which of the three major forms of mediation you use:

Mediation can be private, court-sponsored, or community-based.

The cost of a private mediator is higher than that of court-sponsored or community mediation. Private mediation, on the other hand, is more likely to result in a comprehensive resolution of all concerns in your divorce, which could save you money in the long run.

The Price of Divorce Mediation in a Private Setting

You and your spouse will choose and pay a neutral, trained mediator in private divorce mediation. You could also use a divorce mediation agency, which would assign you a mediator (more on that below). Rather than making decisions for you (as a judge would) or advocating for one side or the other (as your lawyers would), the mediator will work with you to find solutions to the challenges in your divorce that you can both agree on. (Learn more about how divorce mediation works.)

The overall cost of private divorce mediation is usually between $3,000 and $8,000, however it might vary depending on the circumstances. If you and your spouse split the expense 50/50, as most couples do, each of you will pay between $1,500 and $4,000 on average.

The cost of mediation is determined by two factors: the mediator’s rate (typically hourly or by the session) and the number of hours of mediation required to reach an agreement on the problems in your case. As we’ll see below, there are other components that go into each of these basic ingredients.

Rates for Attorney-Mediators

The hourly rates for an attorney divorce mediator ranged from $250 to $500.
The hourly prices paid by divorce mediators who are also attorneys vary widely, based on the lawyers’ experience, specialized training, and geographic location.

Rates of non-attorney mediators

The hourly rates for non-attorney mediators ranged from $100 to $350. Non-attorney divorce mediators typically charge less than attorneys, however hourly charges vary depending on qualification, training, experience, and location.

Packages for Divorce Mediation

After an initial examination of your case, some private mediators or mediation agencies will charge a set rate. In some areas, there are also companies that offer flat-rate packages for divorce mediation services without requiring an assessment of your circumstances. In most circumstances, the cost of either sort of flat-rate package is between $4,000 and $5,500, though it can be more in complicated cases. Mediation packages may offer varying levels of service or features, so pay attention to the fine print when comparing prices. Some services charge a flat fee for an infinite amount of mediation hours, while others have a limit (with an extra hourly charge if further sessions are needed). Others, following a free initial consultation, will quote a flat charge that is relevant to your case. Some services use family law attorney mediators, while others use non-legal mediators, or a combination of the two.
Preparing a formal settlement agreement and/or completing other divorce forms may or may not be included in the package.

Source: https://collaborativedivorcetexas.com/steps-telling-spouse-want-divorce/

Need a Divorce Lawyer in Scottsdale or Phoenix?

As proven legal counsel in family court, we have a network of Arizona attorneys, expert witnesses, mediators, tax specialists, estate planners, financial planners, child specialists, real property appraisers, adult and child therapists and parenting coordinators who are here for you if you ever need them. Our lawyersdivorce mediators and collaborative divorce attorneys in Scottsdale are here to make your divorce less stressful and keep you in control and the costs contained. Call today for an initial consultation at 480-744-7711 or [email protected]. Our family lawyers can also help with divorce litigation, child custodylegal guardianshippaternityprenuptial agreements, and more.

*This information is not intended to be legal advice. Please contact Canterbury Law Group today to learn more about your personal legal needs.

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How to File for Divorce When Spouse is Out of State

How to Tell Your Spouse You Want a Divorce

If you and your spouse live in different states but want to divorce, it can be done. If your spouse filed for divorce first in a different state, that filing and that state’s laws usually control the proceeding. Read on to learn more.

When you want to divorce your spouse, first determine whether one or both of you meet the residency requirements of the state where you intend to file for divorce. These requirements differ by state. In most states, at least one of you must have been a resident for at least six months. However, other states apply strict residency requirements of up to one year.

Understand the relationship between filing and jurisdiction.

When you and your spouse now live in separate states and each of you files for divorce in your respective states, the state where the divorce was first filed will likely have jurisdiction over the case. In most cases, the state where either spouse files for divorce first has jurisdiction over important decisions in the divorce, including the division of the couple’s assets and liabilities and whether spousal maintenance is appropriate.

Decisions on Asset and Liability Division

Different states provide for different treatment of property and debts. In some states, substantially all property owned by the couple or by either spouse is marital property, subject to a 50/50 division. Other states apply an “equitable distribution” standard when dissolving a marriage.

Decisions on Child Custody

When a divorcing couple has one or more minor children, decisions about child support often follow the laws of the state where the child or children are physically located. Child custody determinations in most states follow a “best interests” standard, where the judge presiding over the case considers what is in the child or children’s best interest.

Source: https://info.legalzoom.com/article/what-process-getting-divorced-while-different-states

Need a Divorce Lawyer in Scottsdale or Phoenix?

As proven legal counsel in family court, we have a network of Arizona attorneys, expert witnesses, mediators, tax specialists, estate planners, financial planners, child specialists, real property appraisers, adult and child therapists and parenting coordinators who are here for you if you ever need them. Our lawyersdivorce mediators and collaborative divorce attorneys in Scottsdale are here to make your divorce less stressful and keep you in control and the costs contained. Call today for an initial consultation at 480-744-7711 or [email protected]. Our family lawyers can also help with divorce litigation, child custodylegal guardianshippaternityprenuptial agreements, and more.

*This information is not intended to be legal advice. Please contact Canterbury Law Group today to learn more about your personal legal needs.

How To Divorce Your Wife And Keep Everything
Written by Canterbury Law Group

How To Divorce Your Wife

How To Divorce Your Wife And Keep Everything

Divorce is a major life-changing event and can be devastating and traumatic for a family. If there are children involved, the divorce can have profound impacts on them, which they will carry with them their entire lives. However, if a divorcing spouse has a basic understanding of what the divorce process in Arizona will entail, he/she will likely feel a sense of comfort and be able to pass that on to the children.

  • A divorce action is commenced in Arizona upon the filing of a Petition for Dissolution. The Petition will include the filing spouse’s general positions relative to custody, division of assets and debts, financial support and attorney fees. The Petition for Dissolution must then be served upon the other spouse, who will have 20 days to file a Response.Once the initial pleadings have been filed, the next phase of a divorce begins. During the discovery phase, both spouses are required to disclose certain documentation that can be reviewed by the attorneys in order to make an assessment of what assets and debts exist and their respective values. In addition, formal discovery requests may be issued in this phase. Again, responses to discovery requests are primarily utilized by the attorneys to make an assessment of what and how assets and debts should be divided between the spouses. The discovery phase may also include depositions and requests for documentation issued directly to third parties.How long does a divorce take?In Arizona, a divorce can take anywhere from six months to one year to complete. This can be a difficult and unstable time for families because there are not yet orders in place relative to contact with the children, financial support and temporary possession of certain assets, including vehicles and the marital residence. Therefore, a spouse who needs assistance with these issues during the divorce process can file a Motion for Temporary Orders. Once this motion is filed, temporary orders can typically be issued by the court within 60-90 days and will stay in place until final orders are issued by the court or agreed upon between the spouses.

    Once the discovery process has been completed, then the attorneys and spouses can engage in settlement negotiations. There are several methods that can be used to negotiate and, hopefully, resolve a matter without costly, time consuming and emotionally tolling litigation. Depending on the facts and complexity of the matter, settlement negotiations can take place in correspondence between the attorneys, an in-person mediation through the court or during a private mediation. In the event that the spouses are able to negotiate an agreement, then the agreement will be incorporated into a final Decree of Dissolution, Property Settlement and Joint Parenting Plan.

    In cases where the spouses are unable to resolve some or all of the issues, it will be necessary to attend a trial where the judge will hear testimony from witnesses and review evidence. Ultimately, the court will issue the final orders for any matters that the spouses were unable to resolve amongst themselves. Once a trial is completed, the judge has up to 60 days to issue a ruling that sets forth the final orders. In some cases, the judge’s ruling is the final Decree of Dissolution. In other cases, the court directs one of the attorneys to draft a Decree of Dissolution that incorporates the rulings.

    Whether a divorce case settles or proceeds to trial, it is critical to have an experienced attorney on your side who can protect your rights and advise you as to what you may be entitled to under Arizona law.

Need a Divorce Lawyer in Scottsdale or Phoenix?

As proven legal counsel in family court, we have a network of Arizona attorneys, expert witnesses, mediators, tax specialists, estate planners, financial planners, child specialists, real property appraisers, adult and child therapists and parenting coordinators who are here for you if you ever need them. Our lawyersdivorce mediators and collaborative divorce attorneys in Scottsdale are here to make your divorce less stressful and keep you in control and the costs contained. Call today for an initial consultation at 480-744-7711 or [email protected]. Our family lawyers can also help with divorce litigation, child custodylegal guardianshippaternityprenuptial agreements, and more.

*This information is not intended to be legal advice. Please contact Canterbury Law Group today to learn more about your personal legal needs.

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Why Are Divorce Rates So High?

Why Are Divorce Rates So High?

What factors are associated with a higher risk for divorce? Read on to learn more.

  • Young age.  Marriage at a very young age increases the likelihood of divorce, especially in the early years of marriage.
  • Less education.  Research shows that those with at least some college education (vs. high school or not finishing high school) have a lower chance of divorce.   
  • Less income.  Having a modest income can help couples avoid stress that may lead to divorce.   
  • Premarital cohabitation.  Couples who live together before marriage appear to have a higher chance of divorce if they marry, but the risk is mostly true for those who have cohabited with multiple partners.  A common belief is that living together before marriage provides an opportunity to get to know each other better, but research has found those that live together before marriage have already developed some leniency towards divorce.   This leniency towards divorce is what leads the couple to become high risk. However, there are some caveats to these findings.  Research suggests couples who get engaged and then move in together are no longer at a high risk for future divorce.   Their commitment towards marriage reduces the risk of a future divorce.
  • Premarital childbearing and pregnancy.  Childbearing and pregnancy prior to marriage significantly increase the likelihood of future divorce.
  • No religious affiliation.  Researchers have estimated those with a religious affiliation compared to those who belong to no religious group are less likely to divorce.
  • Parents’ divorce.  Unfortunately, experiencing the divorce of your parents doubles your risk for divorce.  And if your spouse also experienced their parents’ divorce than your risk for divorce triples.  This does not mean you are predisposed to having your marriage end in divorce, only that you may need to be more aware of your marriage trends and work harder for a successful marriage.  For more information on what a healthy marriage entails click here.  

Need a Divorce Lawyer in Scottsdale or Phoenix?

As proven legal counsel in family court, we have a network of Arizona attorneys, expert witnesses, mediators, tax specialists, estate planners, financial planners, child specialists, real property appraisers, adult and child therapists and parenting coordinators who are here for you if you ever need them. Our lawyersdivorce mediators and collaborative divorce attorneys in Scottsdale are here to make your divorce less stressful and keep you in control and the costs contained. Call today for an initial consultation at 480-744-7711 or [email protected]. Our family lawyers can also help with divorce litigation, child custodylegal guardianshippaternityprenuptial agreements, and more.

*This information is not intended to be legal advice. Please contact Canterbury Law Group today to learn more about your personal legal needs.

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Stages Of Divorce

Stages Of Divorce

LIke grief, divorce has stages a person goes through. In this post we briefly review those stages. Read on to learn more.

Denial. 

It is often tough to accept that you are in the middle of a divorce and you may think the divorce was entirely your own fault. This can send you into a whirlwind of emotions and thoughts You may think there is something you can do to get back with your partner.

Shock. 

You may act in a way in an abnormal way. The shock of the divorce creates different emotions inside your head that may cause panic. This shock becomes more pronounced when you realize how much time you invested in your marriage and family.

Contrasting Emotions. 

It will be tough to control your emotions. From feeling hope to feeling simply nothing but despair, you will try your best to make sense of all that has happened leading up to this point. You may also find that all you think about is the failure of your marriage.

Bargaining.  

You are still hopeful that your marriage will work out. You are willing to do anything to change yourself and just make things work. You may resort to drastic measures just to get your ex to change his or her mind. What you will need to realize at this point, though, is that you cannot control the feelings of other people. Bargaining only delays the harsh reality of divorce

Letting Go.

 When you realize that nothing you say or do will bring your marriage back, you stop blaming your ex-spouse and start to understand your faults and what contributed to the end of your marriage. You may also feel a sense of freedom and a better outlook about what the future holds for you. You can finally let go and move on.

Acceptance. 

The negative emotions finally stop. You feel that you are finally fit to lead a life that is filled with happiness and satisfaction. This stage will accompany a time period of growth. You will finally understand that there is life after divorce, and that there are more positive things to look forward to in your life.

Need a Divorce Lawyer in Scottsdale or Phoenix?

As proven legal counsel in family court, we have a network of Arizona attorneys, expert witnesses, mediators, tax specialists, estate planners, financial planners, child specialists, real property appraisers, adult and child therapists and parenting coordinators who are here for you if you ever need them. Our lawyersdivorce mediators and collaborative divorce attorneys in Scottsdale are here to make your divorce less stressful and keep you in control and the costs contained. Call today for an initial consultation at 480-744-7711 or [email protected]. Our family lawyers can also help with divorce litigation, child custodylegal guardianshippaternityprenuptial agreements, and more.

*This information is not intended to be legal advice. Please contact Canterbury Law Group today to learn more about your personal legal needs.

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Written by Canterbury Law Group

How to Tell Your Spouse You Want a Divorce

How to Tell Your Spouse You Want a Divorce

If you are unhappy and considering divorce, but don’t know how to tell your spouse, read on to learn more.

Don’t Ambush Your Spouse.

Even if your spouse knows how unhappy you are, there is no assurance he/she isn’t in denial about a divorce. Let your spouse know you need to talk about something serious and make an appointment.

Pick a Private Place.

Choose a quiet time when you won’t be distracted, unless you are concerned about safety.  

Be Prepared for Anger.

There is no easy way to tell someone you loved, married, and lived with for years that you want to divorce them.  Be prepared for crying, anger, denial, blame, and arguments.

Plan What to Say.

Think out how you want to share your feelings and be clear about your message.  Begin with a short summary of your unhappiness, make certain he/she understands the seriousness of the situation, and then clearly state that you don’t want to be married to him/her anymore. 

Don’t Blame.

Don’t criticize your spouse or argue about the past, because you won’t be able to agree on what happened.  Use “I” statements, focus on neutral language, report how you feel, and be sympathetic about his/her feelings.

Stay Calm.

Most likely your spouse will become upset when you tell him/her you want a divorce and he/she may become angry, want to argue or may even threaten you. Listen to their arguments and respond in a calm manner that you understand how difficult this is to hear and how hurtful it must be.

Avoid a Trial Separation.

If your spouse tries to negotiate a trial separation rather than a divorce, tell him/her you want a divorce not a separation, and that your mind’s made up. 

Maintain Boundaries.

After delivering the bad news, you may feel guilty and want to comfort your spouse by being affectionate.  That’s a mistake.  Maintain your personal boundaries and keep your distance.

Source: https://collaborativedivorcetexas.com/steps-telling-spouse-want-divorce/

Need a Divorce Lawyer in Scottsdale or Phoenix?

As proven legal counsel in family court, we have a network of Arizona attorneys, expert witnesses, mediators, tax specialists, estate planners, financial planners, child specialists, real property appraisers, adult and child therapists and parenting coordinators who are here for you if you ever need them. Our lawyersdivorce mediators and collaborative divorce attorneys in Scottsdale are here to make your divorce less stressful and keep you in control and the costs contained. Call today for an initial consultation at 480-744-7711 or [email protected]. Our family lawyers can also help with divorce litigation, child custodylegal guardianshippaternityprenuptial agreements, and more.

*This information is not intended to be legal advice. Please contact Canterbury Law Group today to learn more about your personal legal needs.

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How Divorce Affects Children

How Divorce Affects Children

All parents wonder what the impact will be on their child or children when their parents divorce. It may even prevent some couples from taking that final step. However, much understanding has emerged regarding the typical reactions a child or children may have when faced with this life changing event. Read on to learn more.

Why the First Year Is the Toughest

During the first year, kids may experience distress, anger, anxiety, and disbelief. Once their resilience kicks in many kids become accustomed to changes in their daily routines. Nonetheless, there is a small percentage who never find a new “normal” and the emotional impact a divorce has may last a lifetime. 

Emotional Impact of Divorce

The younger child will often struggle to comprehend why they must go between two homes. While a child or children of grade school age may think they were somehow responsible for the breakup. Teenagers have been known to attribute blame to one parent or the other for a divorce. And of course, there are children who feel a great sense of relief if a divorce creates less tension at home. 

Divorce-Related Stress

Divorce can mean a child or children experience less contact with one parent, typically, a Father. The nature of the relationship with the custodial parent also changes as the parent often experiences higher stress levels.

Risks Families Face

Children will have to adapt to ongoing changes to their family dynamics. The addition of a step-parent and possibly several step-siblings can be another big adjustment. The failure rate for second marriages is even higher than first marriages. So many children experience multiple separations and divorces over the years.

Behavior Problems

Children from divorced families may experience more externalizing problems, such as conduct disorders, delinquency, and impulsive behavior than kids from two-parent families. In addition to increased behavior problems, children may also experience more conflict with peers after a divorce. There is also an increased chance of mental health issues developing over time.

Poor Academic Performance

Children from divorced families don’t always perform as well academically. However, a study published in 2019 suggested kids from divorced families tended to have trouble with school if the divorce was unexpected, whereas children from families where divorce was likely didn’t have the same outcome.

Collaborative Divorce 

You may want to consider collaborative divorce to give your family an opportunity to work through your differences and focus on results. 

Source: https://www.verywellfamily.com/psychological-effects-of-divorce-on-kids-4140170

Need a Divorce Lawyer in Scottsdale or Phoenix?

As proven legal counsel in family court, we have a network of Arizona attorneys, expert witnesses, mediators, tax specialists, estate planners, financial planners, child specialists, real property appraisers, adult and child therapists and parenting coordinators who are here for you if you ever need them. Our lawyersdivorce mediators and collaborative divorce attorneys in Scottsdale are here to make your divorce less stressful and keep you in control and the costs contained. Call today for an initial consultation at 480-744-7711 or [email protected]. Our family lawyers can also help with divorce litigation, child custodylegal guardianshippaternityprenuptial agreements, and more.

*This information is not intended to be legal advice. Please contact Canterbury Law Group today to learn more about your personal legal needs.

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How to Tell Your Wife You Want a Divorce

How to Tell Your Wife You Want a Divorce

The divorce conversation is very painful for both parties. Hurt feelings are inevitable. Read on to learn some tips on having this life changing discussion.

Have the Conversation

Regardless of the duration of the marriage, the conversation needs to happen, unless there is an element of personal danger to yourself or your child or children. You cannot just leave the house and never return. It is not acceptable to have the local Sheriff serve a summons before divorce is mentioned.

Be Safe

If there may be a rick your spouse may become violent, have the conversation in a public place or have a witness when you have the discussion. Keep a cell phone handy with “911” pre-programmed and if you must be alone, make sure someone else knows where you are and the purpose of the meeting. You can decide for your child or children to reside somewhere else for a few days if there is a rick of violence.

Be Sensitive

Consider where and how you will want to have this discussion. A place for privacy is especially important. You do need to tell your spouse in person. This is not a conversation for an email or a text.

Be Kind

You need to be direct in the conversation. You need to resist the urge to blame the spouse or express your disappointment with them. You also need to resist the urge to flaunt the details of any new relationships on the scene.

Be Honest

You need to state clearly there is no chance of reconciliation. Do not opt for the easier option of a “trial separation” as the easier way out if there is no future for the relationship. If you are having an affair, be honest. It is highly likely the truth will come out, regardless.

Make Time

Picking the right time for the interview is key. Just before your spouse goes to work is not a good idea! Although you may have considered this conversation for a considerable period, if your spouse decides to storm off – you must accept that you prepared for the conversation.

Don’t Fight

By not saying hurtful things to your spouse or avoiding shaming, arguing, or blaming, you can minimize the possibilities of a fight. If your spouse decides they are up for a fight or responds in an aggressive manner – you can choose to halt the conversation and return to it at a time when both parties are calmer.

Don’t Involve The Kids

Never have your kids present when discussing divorce. Even if a child or children understand the reasons for a divorce, do not involve them in the discussion. Similarly, if your kids are already grown-up, they need to be kept away from the divorce process.

Be Prepared For A Bad Reaction

You can never tell for sure how your spouse will react when you have the conversation. They may become very unsettled and start to argue, or they may withdraw and say nothing. You can only control your own reaction if you are prepared for the conversation.

Practice Your Conversation In Advance

There is no perfect break up regardless of how it may look in the media. So, rehearsing how you will deliver the conversation to your spouse will help you say what you want to say and keep the conversation on track.

Don’t Dive Into Unnecessary Details

You may have considered divorce for many years and worked out your future life in minute detail. However, the divorce discussion does not have to include a moving-out contingency. Nor do you need to mention who will have the kids or property division. If the spouse wants to have that chat, that is fine. But most people are going to need to accept the idea a divorce is wanted before moving forward.

Consider Including Your Spouse In Your Decision

Springing the divorce conversation on your spouse is never a great idea – but you need to understand your spouse may not see the same problems that are glaringly obvious to you. Dropping hints does not usually work. It may also be your spouse does not believe you when you tell them. Regardless of their reaction, this is an exceedingly difficult conversation to have. Yet the way you kick off the divorce proceedings can have a big impact on the outcome.

Source: https://karencovy.com/how-to-tell-your-spouse-that-you-want-a-divorce/

Need a Divorce Lawyer in Scottsdale or Phoenix?

As proven legal counsel in family court, we have a network of Arizona attorneys, expert witnesses, mediators, tax specialists, estate planners, financial planners, child specialists, real property appraisers, adult and child therapists and parenting coordinators who are here for you if you ever need them. Our lawyersdivorce mediators and collaborative divorce attorneys in Scottsdale are here to make your divorce less stressful and keep you in control and the costs contained. Call today for an initial consultation at 480-744-7711 or [email protected]. Our family lawyers can also help with divorce litigation, child custodylegal guardianshippaternityprenuptial agreements, and more.

*This information is not intended to be legal advice. Please contact Canterbury Law Group today to learn more about your personal legal needs.

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Types of Divorce in Arizona

Types of Divorce in Arizona

Once you make the decision to divorce in AZ, you have several options. In this article we will look at some of the most popular options. Read on to learn more.

Contested Divorce in Arizona

With a contested divorce, you may try to negotiate a settlement, but if you are not successful, you may be leaving the decisions in the hands of a judge. These issues may include:

1. Child-related matters such as legal decision-making
2. Parenting time and child support
3. Financial issues such as distribution of property and assets
4. Allocation of debts
5. Determination of spousal maintenance

Uncontested Divorce in Arizona

If terms have been agreed for your divorce from the outset, your divorce might be considered “uncontested.” The paperwork can be filed setting forth your agreements and the case can be completed without the involvement of a judge.

Collaborative Divorce And Divorce Mediation in Arizona

Collaborative divorce in Arizona is a private process that can provide a path to a peaceful divorce even if you and your spouse are not necessarily in agreement on financial and child-related issues coming into the process. Each spouse has a lawyer to advocate for their interests. Divorce Mediation in Arizona is when a neutral third party, works with both parties to facilitate agreements regarding divorce issues without the involvement of a judge.

Default Divorce in Arizona

If you file a Petition for Dissolution of Marriage in Arizona and your spouse doesn’t file a Response within 20 days (30 days if he or she lives out of state), you may be able to ask the court to allow you to proceed by “default.”

Legal Separation in Arizona

The process of legal separation in Arizona is a similar to divorce in that the court enters orders regarding legal decision making, parenting time and child support, as well as division of assets/debts and spousal maintenance; however, the parties are still legally married at the end of a legal separation, whereas the marriage is terminated at the end of a divorce.

Do I Need a Divorce Lawyer in Arizona?

You may not need a divorce lawyer to end your marriage in Arizona. But there are some situations where hiring a divorce lawyer would be a good idea. For example:

  • Your spouse made more income and you want to request spousal support
  • You are concerned about how to divide assets and property acquired during the marriage
  • You or your spouse has debt that you aren’t sure how to divide
  • You have children and want information about how child support payments will be determined

Need a Divorce Lawyer in Scottsdale or Phoenix?

As proven legal counsel in family court, we have a network of Arizona attorneys, expert witnesses, mediators, tax specialists, estate planners, financial planners, child specialists, real property appraisers, adult and child therapists and parenting coordinators who are here for you if you ever need them. Our lawyersdivorce mediators and collaborative divorce attorneys in Scottsdale are here to make your divorce less stressful and keep you in control and the costs contained. Call today for an initial consultation at 480-744-7711 or [email protected]. Our family lawyers can also help with divorce litigation, child custodylegal guardianshippaternityprenuptial agreements, and more.

*This information is not intended to be legal advice. Please contact Canterbury Law Group today to learn more about your personal legal needs.

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